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The American Journal of Health Promotion  is a peer-reviewed journal on the science of lifestyle change.   The editorial goal of the American Journal of Health Promotion is to provide a forum for exchange among the many disciplines involved in health promotion and an interface between researchers and practitioners.
The Art of Health Promotion is a newsletter for practitioners published in each issue that provides practical information to make programs more effective. 

Now Available

 

Health Promotion in the Workplace - 4th Edition

Michael P. O'Donnell, MBA, MPH, PhD

 

Completely Revised and Updated

Two new sections | Nine new chapters


 Michael ODonnell

 From the Editor

 Editor's Notes: November/December 2014

 

  Michael P. O'Donnell, PhD, MBA, MPH

 

Why Do We Allow Smokers to Assault the People We Love?
Secondhand Smoke, Benzenze, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Immunosuppression and the Americans with Disabilities Act  

 

Most of us put up with secondhand smoke. We let family and friends smoke at picnics. We let coworkers violate smoke free policies at work. We let our employers stall on creating work environments that are really smoke free. We do this even though secondhand smoke kills more than 40,000 people and injures hundreds of thousands in the United States each year. Why? Why do we allow smokers to assault the people we love? If we decide to take action, the American Disabilities Act may provide the vehicle.

 

‘‘The transplant was successful. I am cancer free.’’ That is the unexpected and wonderful news I received in an e-mail on June 28, the news that allowed me to believe my sister Maura was on the road to recovery for the first time in 9 months.  June 28 was 217 days after Maura was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 91 days after Maura had a bone marrow transplant. More on that in a moment.

 

Most of us put up with secondhand smoke. We let family and friends smoke at picnics. We let coworkers violate smoke-free policies at work. We let our employers stall on creating work environments that are really smoke free. Why? We hate conflict. We want people to have freedom to do what they want. We don’t feel empowered to confront someone who is violating a policy or just being rude when he or she blows smoke in our faces. We are also sympathetic to the power of the physical addiction to nicotine. Plus, is secondhand smoke actually dangerous?  << Read full article>>                               Comment at our blog

 

2015 Logo

 

 

What’s Next for Health Promotion?  What New Approaches Will Produce the Best Outcomes?

March 30 - April 3, 2015

 

 

Mobile AppCore Conference:  April 1 - April 3, 2015

Intensive Training Seminars:  March 30 & 31, 2015
WELCOA National Training Summit: March 30 & 31, 2015


Manchester Grand Hyatt | San Diego, California

   

Register Now

 

 

Featuring Keynote Speakers

Keynotes 

Definition of Health Promotion

 

Health Promotion is the art and science of helping people discover the synergies between their core passions and optimal health, enhancing their motivation to strive for optimal health, and supporting them in changing their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health. Optimal health is a dynamic balance of physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and intellectual health. Lifestyle change can be facilitated through a combination of learning experiences that enhance awareness, increase motivation, and build skills and, most important, through the creation of opportunities that open access to environments that make positive health practices the easiest choice.

Michael P. O'Donnell (2009) Definition of Health Promotion 2.0: Embracing Passion, Enhancing Motivation, Recognizing Dynamic Balance, and Creating Opportunities. American Journal of Health Promotion: September/October 2009, Vol. 24, No. 1, pp. iv-iv.
 

 
 
 Physical     : Fitness. Nutrition. Medical self-care. Control of substance abuse.
 
  Emotional  : Care for emotional crisis. Stress Management
 
  Social         : Communities. Families. Friends
 
  Intellectual : Educational. Achievement. Career development
 
  Spiritual     : Love. Hope. Charity.